"It IS all about the TASTE"
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  • Cilantro Rice

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    Ingredients:

    1 1/2 cups uncooked rice
    1 1/2 teaspoons salt
    1/2 cup whole almonds
    1 cup loosely packed cilantro leaves
    1/4 cup sliced shallots
    2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1/4 cup finely sliced scallion rings

    Preperation:
    In a heavy saucepan over medium-high heat, bring the rice, 2 cups water, and the salt to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cover with a tight-fitting lid. Cook for 20 minutes, until the rice is tender.
    Preheat the oven to 375 F.
    Spread the almonds on a rimmed baking sheet. Bake for 8 minutes, until toasted and fragrant. Remove from the oven and allow to cool.
    Place the almonds, cilantro, shallots, lime juice, and oil in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade. Pulse to combine and roughly chop. Toss the mixture with the hot rice. Garnish with the scallions.

    Serves 4

  • RAISIN OATMEAL COOKIES

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    Makes about 25 cookies.
    Prep Time= 10 minutes.
    Cook Time= 10-12 minutes.

    Ingredients:

    • ¾ cup (1-½ sticks) butter, softened
    • 1 1/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar
    • 1/4 cup molasses
    • ½ cup granulated sugar
    • 2 eggs
    • ½ tsp vanilla extract
    • 1 tsp bourbon
    • 1-½ cups all-purpose flour
    • 1 tsp baking soda
    • 1 tsp cinnamon
    • 1 tsp allspice
    • ½ tsp salt
    • 3 cups Oats
    • 1-½ cups raisins, soaked overnight in bourbon (good not not great stuff)

    Preparation:

    1. Soak raisins in bourbon overnight.
    2. Preheat oven to 350F. Beat together butter and sugars until creamy. Add eggs, vanilla and bourbon; beat well.
    3. Add combined flour, baking soda, cinnamon, allspice, and salt; mix well. Stir in oats and raisins; mix well.
    4. Drop by heaping tablespoonfuls onto ungreased cookie sheet, 2 inches apart. Bake 10-12 minutes or until golden brown. Cool 1 minute on cookie sheet; remove to wire rack.
  • CRUSTY FRENCH BREAD

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    CRUSTY FRENCH BREAD

    Ingredients :

    • 12 oz Bread (strong) flour
    • 4 oz Unbleached All Purpose flour
    • 1/4 – 1/2 oz Yeast
    • 1/2 oz Salt
    • 10 oz Water

    Preparation:
    Dissolve yeast in warm water in large bowl; stir in sugar. Let stand 45 minutes. Stir in 3/4 flour and salt; beat until smooth. Stir in enough remaining flour to make dough easy to handle.

    Turn dough onto lightly floured surface; knead until smooth and elastic (about 5 minutes). Place into greased bowl; turn greased-side up. Cover; let rise in warm place until double in size (about 1 1/2 hours). (Dough is ready if indentation remains when touched.)

    Punch down dough; divide into quarters. Shape each quarter into 15-inch loaf (baguette) or 5-inch round on greased baking sheets. Cover; let rise until double in size (about 30 minutes).

    Heat oven to 400°F. Make 5 diagonal slashes across top of each loaf with serrated knife. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes or until a dark golden brown and nutty smell. Remove from baking sheets; cool on wire racks.

    Variations:

    1. For a higher oven “bounce” mist the oven 3 times at 5 minute intervals.
    2. For a crisper crust prop the oven door open 1/2″ for last 10 minutes.
    3. For more “holes” use a wetter dough, and mist the dough before putting it into the oven
    4. For a crumblier / glossy crust, beat the yellow of one egg and brush before putting loaves into the oven
  • Shrimp

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    BUYING SHRIMP:

    It’s preferable to buy shrimp frozen – most are sold in five-pound blocks – as fresh is rare and thawed shrimp gives neither the flavor of fresh nor the flexibility of frozen. The shelf life of thawed shrimp is only a couple of days, whereas shrimp stored in the freezer retain their quality for several weeks.

    Avoid peeled and deveined shrimp; cleaning before freezing may cause a loss of flavor and texture.

    Avoid brown shrimp, especially large ones, if your palate is sensitive to iodine as they are the most likely to taste of this naturally occurring mineral.
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