"It IS all about the TASTE"
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  • 1-2-3-4 Rub

    spices

    Just a pinch of sugar can add a lot to a hunk o’ meat. The chemical action will help to will help achieve the much sought after crisp crust and tender juicy meat.

    This is a base rub, one can add other items, cumin, chili powder, herbs and other spices to create your own signature flavors.

  • Mango Chutney

    Mango_Chutney

    As with all events at the Bad Wolf Bar and Grille, Poker night would not be Poker night without food from the kitchen, and drinks from the bar.

    On one such evening, I decided on an Indian flair, and made my first attempt at Samosa’s. These were “passable”, as in passable to starving wolves, with several libations in them. The TRUE star of the snack table was a mango chutney, I had thrown together on a whim.

    Of course, having thrown this together on a whim, means no measuring, no recipe, no clue. (BAD ROGUECHEF!!!) Over the next several weeks, I made several attempts to recreate the chutney, and after many tries, and samples produced, tasted, and rejected, I managed to come very close to the original. And to make sure I DON’T have to do this again, I kept notes.

    From Wikipedia:

    Chutney is a loan word incorporated into English from Hindi-Urdu describing a pasty sauce in Indian[1] and other South Asian cuisines. It is a term for a class of spicy preparations used as an accompaniment for a main dish. Chutneys usually contain an idiosyncratic but complementary spice and vegetable mix.

    Chutneys are wet or dry, having a coarse to fine texture. The Anglo-Indian loan word refers to fresh and pickled preparations indiscriminately, with preserves often sweetened. At least several Northern Indian languages use the word for fresh preparations only. A different word achār applies to preserves that often contain oil but are rarely sweet. Vinegar or citrus juice may be added as preservatives, or fermentation in the presence of salt may be used to create acid.

    In the past, chutneys were ground with a mortar and pestle made of stone or an ammikkal (Tamil). Nowadays, electric blenders replace the stone implements. Various spices are added and ground, usually in a particular order; the wet paste thus made is sauteed in vegetable oil, usually gingelly or groundnut oil.

    American and European styled chutneys are usually fruit, vinegar and sugar, cooked down to a reduction. Flavorings are always added to the mix. These may include sugar, salt, garlic, tamarind, onion, or ginger.