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  • Light / Straight Rye Bread

    Posted on May 7th, 2017 admin No comments

    It’s cool today, so I’m thinking a hearty beef stew or Carbonnade, and a fresh bread.

    Puttering around the kitchen / lab, I find I have almost enough bread flour, so I’ll need to lengthen it with another flour, while whole wheat jumps the front of my mind, there is a bag of rye sitting in front of it. A quick check shows, I also have a fresh bottle of caraway seeds. Sounds like a light rye loaf to me.

    Classic rye bread has various flour ratios, ranging from 25% rye to 50% rye, I’ll go with a 12.5 % rye to bread flour. (It uses all the bread flour, and i’ll not mess with my hydration ratios) Hence a “LIGHT” rye bread.

    From Wikipedia:

    Rye bread is a type of bread made with various proportions of flour from rye grain. It can be light or dark in color, depending on the type of flour used and the addition of coloring agents, and is typically denser than bread made from wheat flour. It is higher in fiber than white bread and is often darker in color and stronger in flavor.

    Pure rye bread contains only rye flour, without any wheat. German-style pumpernickel, a dark, dense, and close-textured loaf, is made from crushed or ground whole rye grains, usually without wheat flour, baked for long periods at low temperature in a covered tin. Rye and wheat flours are often used to produce a rye bread with a lighter texture, color and flavor than pumpernickel. “Light” or “dark” rye flour can be used to make rye bread; the flour is classified according to the amount of bran left in the flour after milling. Caramel or molasses for coloring and caraway seeds are often added to rye bread. In the United States, breads labeled as “rye” nearly always contain caraway unless explicitly labeled as “unseeded.”

    In Canada (especially Montreal), breads labeled as “rye” often have no seeds, whereas breads labeled as “kimmel” are usually rye with caraway seeds. Some unique rye bread recipes include ground spices such as fennel, coriander, aniseed, cardamom, or citrus peel. In addition to caramel and molasses, ingredients such as coffee, cocoa, or toasted bread crumbs are sometimes used for both color and flavor in very dark breads like pumpernickels. The addition of caraway seeds to rye bread is to counter the bloating that can be caused by the high fiber content of rye. Caraway has well-known anti-flatulence properties; however, the association is so long-standing that the flavor combination is now almost inseparable.

    A simple, all-rye bread can be made using a sourdough starter and rye meal; it will not rise as high as a wheat bread, but will be more moist with a substantially longer keeping time. Such bread is often known as “black bread” (Schwarzbrot in German, chyorniy khleb in Russian) from their darker color than wheat breads (enhanced by long baking times, creating Maillard reactions in the crumb).

    A very similar, but darker, bread, German-style pumpernickel, has an even darker color derived from toasted leftover bread and other agents. Due to the density of the bread, the yeast in the starter is used at least as much for the fermentation character in the bread itself as it is for leavening.

    I’ll cheat and use my basic bread dough / baking recipe here.

    Light Rye Bread
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    Servings Prep Time
    6People 30min
    Cook Time Passive Time
    45min 3-4Hours
    Servings Prep Time
    6People 30min
    Cook Time Passive Time
    45min 3-4Hours
    Light Rye Bread
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    Votes: 0
    Rating: 0
    You:
    Rate this recipe!
    Servings Prep Time
    6People 30min
    Cook Time Passive Time
    45min 3-4Hours
    Servings Prep Time
    6People 30min
    Cook Time Passive Time
    45min 3-4Hours
    Ingredients
    Servings: People
    Units:
    Instructions
    1. Mix flours, salt, yeast, and seeds in a large bowl
    2. Add water and oil, mix to for a rough dough
    3. cover and let autolyse for at least 1 hour, and up to 2, Needs to double in size
    4. Turn out onto lightly floured board (I used more rye flour here) and kneed to a smooth texture, shape and place into lightly oiled bowl. Cover and let rise. at least 1 hour and up to 2. Needs to double in size
    5. Preheat oven to 400 degree, and place a metal pan in the bottom
    6. GENTLY, turn dough on to a prepared sheet pan, (dusted with Semolina), dust with rye flour, sprinkle with more caraway seeds, slash and bake for 30-45 minutes
    7. When internal temp of bread reaches ~200 degrees, and the color is right, remove from oven, and cool on a cooling rack for 30 minutes.
    Recipe Notes

    Note: One can add dill to the dough, or one can mix sesame seeds, caraway seeds, poppy seeds, onion flakes, garlic flakes, dill seeds, crushed oats, and coarse salt for a "everything" topping.

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