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  • Texas Red – Chili

    Posted on March 17th, 2017 admin No comments

    With the recently departed Stella, and the oncoming snow for the weekend, it is time for some serious hearty food. And for this Texas boy, that means meat, and since I live in New York, I have no time to spend hours cooking, so that means the slow cooker.

    From Wikipedia:

    Chili con carne, commonly known in American English as simply “chili”, is a spicy stew containing chili peppers, meat (usually beef), and often tomatoes and beans. Other seasonings may include garlic, onions, and cumin.

    Geographic and personal tastes involve different types of meat and ingredients. Recipes provoke disputes among aficionados, some of whom insist that the word “chili” applies only to the basic dish, without beans and tomatoes. Chili con carne is a frequent dish for cook-offs and is used as an ingredient in other dishes.

    From way back in my youth, these are the days my mother made chili, or Texas Red, no beans, no tomatoes, no mushrooms, no tofu, absolutely nothing fancy, just beef, stock, Allium, and capsicums, and perhaps some cumin, oregano, salt, pepper and other trace element style spices. (Alliums are the onion family, onion, garlic, etc, and capsicums are peppers.)

    To quote a description:

    Texas red if it walks the thin line just this side of indigestibility: damning the mouth that eats it and defying the stomach to digest it, the ingredients are hardly willing to lie in the same pot together.

    If one looks at all the legends of how chili was discovered, there is one thing in common…. ABJECT POVERTY, so the meat involved is not going to be the best, but since it will be close to the horn or the hoof, I am sure it will have flavor beyond compare, and collagen beyond believe. (And this is a good thing….)

    Texas Red
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    Texas red; it walks the thin line just this side of indigestibility: damning the mouth that eats it and defying the stomach to digest it, the ingredients are hardly willing to lie in the same pot together.
    Servings Prep Time
    8Humans, 4 BadWolves 30Minutes
    Cook Time
    8hours
    Servings Prep Time
    8Humans, 4 BadWolves 30Minutes
    Cook Time
    8hours
    Texas Red
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    Votes: 0
    Rating: 0
    You:
    Rate this recipe!
    Texas red; it walks the thin line just this side of indigestibility: damning the mouth that eats it and defying the stomach to digest it, the ingredients are hardly willing to lie in the same pot together.
    Servings Prep Time
    8Humans, 4 BadWolves 30Minutes
    Cook Time
    8hours
    Servings Prep Time
    8Humans, 4 BadWolves 30Minutes
    Cook Time
    8hours
    Ingredients
    Servings: Humans, 4 BadWolves
    Units:
    Instructions
    1. In a cast iron skillet over medium heat, Add Fat Brown meat in batches and move to Slow cooker
    2. Saute onions, garlic and peppers to soften and move to Slow Cooker
    3. Drain Beans and add to slow cooker
    4. Add Spices and stock to cover, mix well
    5. Cook on high for 4-6 hours or low for 8-12. Chili is ready when the meat has broken down, and the sauce is thick
    6. Serve over rice, or crushed Fritos, Passing Grated cheese, and more diced onions on the side.
    Recipe Notes

    Collagen, the predominant protein in connective tissue, is quite tough to chew, and is found in abundance in tougher cuts of meat. At 150 degrees it starts to melt and become gelatin-like as the temperature climbs. At 150 the muscle tissue will have tightened fully and the bonds between individual protein molecules become stronger and tighter. These bonds become so tight they drive water from the meat back into the cooking liquid!

    IF HALTED AT THIS POINT, THE MEAT WILL BECOME TOUGH AND DRY.

    Once the internal temperature of the meat reaches 170 degrees, a second process begins as melted collagen makes meat seem tender and moist. Further heated, the collagen in the muscle will break down progressively into soft gelatin as the tightened muscle tissue strands continue to separate.

    Because collagen won’t melt completely until the internal temperature of the meat reaches 200 degrees, the meat must be cooked to this temperature and held there for an hour to take full advantage of this phenomenon.

    Then moisture from the cooking liquid will accumulate between the fibers of the meat and as the meat is cooked through to an internal temperature of 200 degrees, the bonds between the protein and water actually rupture, and the meat will literally fall apart.

    The finished product is still tough muscle tissue, it will be more succulent as the collagen has converted into soft gelatin. Inspect the meat closely and you’ll see resultant opening of gaps between the tough strands of muscle.

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