"It IS all about the TASTE"
RSS icon Home icon
  • Chicken and Dumplings

    Absolutely perfect weather. For pneumonia… Cool to cold, bit of damp, and just enough sunshine / warmth to make think you can tough it out with a light jacket. (GUESS WHAT? You can’t, you will get that most miserable of all things, a spring cold.)

    Time to fight back a bit, time for soup, chicken soup, and If I am going to take the time to do that, I’ll go Full Valhalla, and make dumplings as well.

    I always have chicken stock in the fridge, (unless one of the lair denizens have drank it straight. Yes, they do that. 3/4 cup of Stock, bit of pepper, a mushroom sliced, and into the microwave for 60 sec. A fast meal)

    From Wikipedia:

    Chicken and dumplings is a dish which consists of a chicken cooked in water, with the resulting chicken broth being used to cook the dumplings by boiling. A dumpling in this context is a biscuit dough, which is a mixture of flour, shortening, and liquid (water, milk, buttermilk, or chicken stock). The dumplings are either rolled out flat, dropped or formed into a ball.

    It is a popular comfort food dish, commonly found in the Southern and Midwestern United States, that is also attributed to being a French Canadian meal that originated during the Great Depression. Chicken and dumplings as a dish is prepared with a combination of boiled chicken meat, broth produced by boiling the chicken, multiple dumplings, and salt and pepper for seasoning. In some areas, this meal is known as chicken and sliders.

  • A New Year’s Cholent

    It is Rosh Hashanah, and while I do not celebrate this, I can truly appreciate the food.

    I’ve been rocking and rolling on various projects and living the S.A.D. (Standard American Diet), life. Time to stop and get back to cooking. I want SERIOUS hearty food, I want meat, root veggies, legumes, all in a rich and savory gravy. But a stew just is not going to cut it, and I’ve done roasts of just about anything that would walk, fly, swim or slither. Time to take a lesson from some friends. Time to make cholent, a savory, rich, stew of brisket, beans, veggies and all held together by a gravy that can only happen after hours of slow cooking.

    I already acknowledge the fact that the “fan club”, will be writing me on ALL the mistakes I’ve made. (Send me your recipes, I’ll try them all)

    Using my slow cooker on low I’ll simmer this for at least 10, maybe 12 hours, or until the collagen in the meat melts

    Wikipedia says:

    Cholent (Yiddish: טשאָלנט, tsholnt or tshoolnt) or hamin (Hebrew: חמין‎) is a traditional Jewish stew simmered overnight, for 12 hours or more, and eaten for lunch on Shabbat (the Sabbath.) Cholent was developed over the centuries to conform with Jewish religious laws that prohibit cooking on the Sabbath. The pot is brought to boil on Friday before the Sabbath begins, and kept on a blech or hotplate, or placed in a slow oven or electric slow cooker until the following day.

    There are many variations of the dish, which is standard in both the Ashkenazi and Sephardi kitchens. The basic ingredients of cholent are meat, potatoes, beans and barley. Sephardi-style hamin uses rice instead of beans and barley, and chicken instead of beef. A traditional Sephardi addition is whole eggs in the shell (haminados), which turn brown overnight. Ashkenazi cholent often contains kishke or helzel – a sausage casing or a chicken neck skin stuffed with a flour-based mixture. Slow overnight cooking allows the flavors of the various ingredients to permeate and produces the characteristic taste of cholent.

    Read the rest of this entry »

  • Patisserie Du Méchant Loup – Oatmeal Rasin

    orpb

    As spoken prior:

    It is November, and Cookie Season is upon us. I need to start baking cookies, as I have requests for ginger snaps, oatmeal chocolate chip, peanut butter blossoms, gingerbread, and sugar cookies, but those are all a lot of different posts, coming soon.

    Yes, my French is horrible…. But my cookies are great. Announcing the opening of the Bad Wolf Cookie Season. May your diets know fear…

    I’ll roll out a few recipes just to kick start the taste buds.

    This would be the post on the Oatmeal Raisin form of diet destroyers…

    From an old family recipe, my wife just gave me..

    Read the rest of this entry »

  • Ginger Snapper Cookies

    gsnaps

    It is November, and Cookie Season is upon us. I need to start baking cookies, as I have requests for oatmeal raisin, oatmeal chocolate chip, peanut butter blossoms, gingerbread, and sugar cookies, but those are all a lot of different posts, coming soon.

    This would be the post on Gingersnap addiction and it’s effect on one’s weight. (Remember, the first sample is always free…)

    Simply stated:

    It is the holidays, Eat, Drink and Be Merry, for Congress is in session and none of our liberties are secure. January 1, 2014 is coming shortly, and we will all make “Resolutions”, (Usually about losing weight…), so before the sack cloth and ashes, live a little…

    These cookies are highly addictive, and derive their chewy texture and spicy flavor from adding brown sugar, molasses, and ground spices (cinnamon, cloves, and ginger in three forms, Ground, Fresh and Candied) to a cookie.

    There are differences (think Jihad) of opinion as to how ‘spicy’ a gingersnap cookie should be, so adjust the batter to suit your own individual taste, I for one want a cookie that bites back, so ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice and cloves, all fresh grated will be added to my standard brown sugar cookie dough, and the addition of a tot of good bourbon, ad a few twists of black pepper for the official RogueChef taste twist.

    A hand full of these with a big glass of eggnogg will put an end to Santa’s night. (That way my grandkids can hold him for ransom….)

    Read the rest of this entry »

  • Memorial Day Sides – Macaroni Salad

    One of the classic pasta salads, macaroni in mayonnaise dressing, with stop light peppers, celery, onion and seasonings. This is a southern dish that has global acceptance. A perfect companion for a Barbecue.

    Macaroni salad is a salad, served cold made with cooked elbow macaroni pasta and usually prepared with mayonnaise. Much like potato salad in its use, it is often served as an accompaniment to barbecue or other picnic style entrees. Like any dish, national and regional variations abound but generally it is prepared with raw diced onions and celery and seasoned with salt and pepper. Canned tuna is also a very popular ingredient.

    In Australia it is commonly known as pasta salad and is usually made with cooked shell pasta pieces and brought from supermarket delis.

    In the U.S. state of Hawaii, macaroni salad is often served with plate lunches, a local form of dining. Locals in Hawaii often refer to macaroni salad as “mac sal” or “mac salad”. The salad itself is usually just elbow macaroni and a heaping portion of mayonnaise.

    Read the rest of this entry »

  • Spicy Dahl

    dahl

    Ok, it’s windy, chilly, nasty, threatening snow. Almost what you see in all the mountain movies about the Himalayas. Soo, hmm, Himalayas, gurka’s, Dal and rice…. But a soup, with Asian chicken stock, one can forgo the chicken stock and use vegetable stock for a vegetarian twist. But as always, we’ll look at some dried red peppers, or maybe serve with a hot pepper / vinegar finishing sauce on the side…

    Background

    Dahl bhat is a traditional South / Central Asian and staple dish which is essentially rice (bhat) and lentil soup (dal). This is a very common food in South Asian countries specially Nepal. In general eaten twice a day with another (usually spicy, maybe hot /sour) dish called tarkari which can be either vegetarian or non-vegetarian..

    The recipes vary by locality, ethnic group, family, as well as the season. Dal generally contains lentils (different types are used according to taste), tomatoes, onion, chili and ginger along with herbs and spices such as coriander, garam-masala and turmeric.

    Read the rest of this entry »