RogueChef

"It IS all about the TASTE"
RSS icon Home icon
  • 1-2-3-4 Rub

    Posted on July 29th, 2015 admin No comments

    spices

    Just a pinch of sugar can add a lot to a hunk o’ meat. The chemical action will help to will help achieve the much sought after crisp crust and tender juicy meat.

    This is a base rub, one can add other items, cumin, chili powder, herbs and other spices to create your own signature flavors.

  • Mango Chutney

    Posted on July 21st, 2015 admin No comments

    Mango_Chutney

    As with all events at the Bad Wolf Bar and Grille, Poker night would not be Poker night without food from the kitchen, and drinks from the bar.

    On one such evening, I decided on an Indian flair, and made my first attempt at Samosa’s. These were “passable”, as in passable to starving wolves, with several libations in them. The TRUE star of the snack table was a mango chutney, I had thrown together on a whim.

    Of course, having thrown this together on a whim, means no measuring, no recipe, no clue. (BAD ROGUECHEF!!!) Over the next several weeks, I made several attempts to recreate the chutney, and after many tries, and samples produced, tasted, and rejected, I managed to come very close to the original. And to make sure I DON’T have to do this again, I kept notes.

    From Wikipedia:

    Chutney is a loan word incorporated into English from Hindi-Urdu describing a pasty sauce in Indian[1] and other South Asian cuisines. It is a term for a class of spicy preparations used as an accompaniment for a main dish. Chutneys usually contain an idiosyncratic but complementary spice and vegetable mix.

    Chutneys are wet or dry, having a coarse to fine texture. The Anglo-Indian loan word refers to fresh and pickled preparations indiscriminately, with preserves often sweetened. At least several Northern Indian languages use the word for fresh preparations only. A different word achār applies to preserves that often contain oil but are rarely sweet. Vinegar or citrus juice may be added as preservatives, or fermentation in the presence of salt may be used to create acid.

    In the past, chutneys were ground with a mortar and pestle made of stone or an ammikkal (Tamil). Nowadays, electric blenders replace the stone implements. Various spices are added and ground, usually in a particular order; the wet paste thus made is sauteed in vegetable oil, usually gingelly or groundnut oil.

    American and European styled chutneys are usually fruit, vinegar and sugar, cooked down to a reduction. Flavorings are always added to the mix. These may include sugar, salt, garlic, tamarind, onion, or ginger.

  • Thai Noodles with Herb Pesto

    Posted on July 9th, 2014 admin No comments

    The Bad Wolf herb garden is in full swing, providing Sweet Basil, Cilantro, Rosemary and many more succulent, fragrant herbs for enjoyment. The rain and heat have done wonders for them, but not so much for my willingness to cook.

    We have a few peppers, chili and bell just beginning to bear. Young bell peppers have a mildly bitter taste that may go very well in my Asian balance for this dish.

    Some salt, some palm sugar, garlic, ginger, chili’s for a bit of heat and of course those lovely herbs for a Asian flair pesto.

    Time to do a bit of that. But I really don’t want to do too much involving heat, so perhaps Noodles or pasta as a “flavor carrier” to get that gorgeous fresh pesto into my mouth.

    Read the rest of this entry »

  • Peach Cobbler

    Posted on June 3rd, 2014 admin No comments

    Just another day in paradise…. Long Day, many crises, and rain as I wait at the taxi stand. But what is that smell, sweet and enticing, so familiar, but I can’t place it..

    Looking around, I see a fruit vendor, and on his cart are Peaches! The smell is wafting over, strangely made stronger by the rain… I had though a quick chopped BBQ sandwich for dinner, but now …. Hmmmmm, Peaches, Cobbler, Ice Cream …. I may just be a day in paradise after all..

    Maybe I’ll do the sandwich as well, but setup a nice little desert to go with coffee afterwards..

    Cobblers:

    Deep-dish fruit desserts in which sweetened fruits (fresh berries or apples are the traditional choices) are topped with a biscuit dough before baking.

    Varieties of cobbler include the Betty, the Grunt, the Slump, and the Buckle. Grunts, Pandowdy, and Slumps are a New England variety of cobbler, typically cooked on the stove-top or cooker in an iron skillet or pan with the dough on top in the shape of dumplings—they reportedly take their name from the grunting sound they make while cooking. A Buckle is made with yellow batter (like cake batter), with the filling mixed in with the batter.

    In the matter of the Cobbler, the Betty, the Grunt, the Slump, and the Buckle, let the trumpets blare, the banners fly high, and the hosts assemble, for this may be the single most contested point in all of culinarium, hotly contested, many battles joined, but with no final victor..

    All that said, I still think of a buckle when you say a cobbler. The difference in my mind is the fruit used and the time of the year your make it.

    As for today’s post I’ll hazard the slings and arrows of culinary fortune and look at another early summer fruit.

    When early summer fruit starts arriving, I have to make a cobbler. It is a simple and rustic dessert recipe, you can use any kind of fruit that is around, the ingredients are pantry staples and it freezes fabulously. When I make cobblers, I usually make two, one to serve and one to keep in the freezer for a quick thaw and serve desert. Blueberries, raspberries, cherries, peaches, apricots, nectarines, all are delicious in a buckle.

    The Team …

    Read the rest of this entry »

  • Texas Style Chicken Fried Steak

    Posted on June 2nd, 2014 admin No comments

    CountryFriedSteak

    Being raised in Texas, and living in New York can be quite the challange for my taste buds, while I get to experience a whole world of flavor and taste sensations, I do get the cravings for the more simple fare of my youth. One all time favorite is Chicken Fried Steak with cream (sawmill) gravy, mashed potatoes and biscuits.

    From WikiPedia:

    Chicken fried steak (also known as pan-fried steak, CFS or country fried steak) is a breaded cutlet dish consisting of a piece of steak (tenderized cube steak) coated with seasoned flour and pan-fried. It is associated with Southern cuisine. The dish gets its name from the fact that the steak is cooked in oil that has already been used to fry chicken. Country fried steak is different in that it can be cooked with any kind of oil.

    Chicken fried steak resembles the Austrian dish Wiener Schnitzel and the Italian-Latin American dish Milanesa, which is a tenderized veal or pork cutlet, coated with flour, eggs, and bread crumbs, and then fried. It is also similar to the recipe for Scottish collops.

    Now these folks talk about a tenderized cube steak, and given my tenancy to to avoid any processing I do not do myself, we’ll look at this from a different point of view.

    Let start with a chuck roast or round roast and cut slices with the grain to ~1/2 inch thick. Then get absolutely medieval with a meat tenderizer or the back of your chef’s knife until the slices are ~1/4″ thick and limp as a wet noodle, or until your arms give out.

    Now we have our tenderized steak, we can cook.
    Read the rest of this entry »

  • Tea Eggs (Cha Ye Dan)

    Posted on May 27th, 2014 admin No comments

    Tea_Eggs

    Here is a little number that has fascinated me for quite some time. I first experienced, these fantastic looking marbled eggs with a light fragrance and outstanding taste, in a surprising hole-in-the-wall in Chinatown, and they have been twisting my imagination ever since.

    As the execrable advertisement said. “Quick… To the cloud!”. Time to do some research..

    Wikipedia says:

    Tea egg is a typical Chinese savory food commonly sold as a snack, in which a pre-boiled egg is cracked and then boiled again in tea, sauce and/or spices. It is also known as marble egg because cracks in the egg shell create darkened lines with marble-like patterns. Commonly sold by street vendors or in night markets in most Chinese communities throughout the world, it is also commonly served in Asian restaurants. Although it originated from China and is traditionally associated with Chinese cuisine, other similar recipes and variations have been developed throughout Asia.

    The process is, as all elegant things, fairly simple. Eggs are hard-boiled, then cracked, but not peeled, rested, then simmered in a steeping mixture. (I have so many side comments in the vein, of “A hard-boiled egg, please. Cracked, but not peeled… All in a Sean Connery brough)
    Read the rest of this entry »